8.5 Oz Clear Iridized Transparent Coarse Frit - 96 COE

$9.95 USD
Item# XF005I
Availability: Expected to be available March 31, 2020. Subject to change. Pre-order now!

Product Features

  • Add a little sparkle with shimmering iridescent coating
  • Coarse frit is ideal for creating a smooth, bubble free casting
  • Great for adding texture when painting with glass
  • 96 COE

Product Description

A staple for hot glass artists, you will find frit useful for many applications, including pâte de verre casting molds. Made from Oceanside sheet glass, clean-crushed and screened. Packaged in convenient 8.5 oz. jars. 96 COE.

First image below shows the iridescent coating of the glass. Second image shows examples of frit coarseness.

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5 out of 5 stars
  •   96 COE clear iridized course frit
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Pros : very handy to have on hand for projects, love the look
Cons :
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Jul 07, 2010
The official answer from the glass manufacturers is, All tested compatible glasses have been tested by the FDA for food bearing surfaces and were determined to be suitable.However, if you add other processes or compounds to the items, for example paint, stains, decals, glazes, etc. it is important to check that these items are also approved for food bearing surfaces. In addition it is of the utmost importance that dinnerware items be properly annealed, especially if youre going to place hot food on them - the thermal shock could cause a break in poorly annealed items. This Randys ProTip brought to you from the book Introduction to Glass Fusing by Petra Kaiser. VisitWardell Publications. Also, at Delphi we take food safety and dinnerware very seriously. We always recommend that certain glasses are capped with clear. These are usually irids, dichro and glass with texture, since these can also trap
Jul 02, 2010
Have you ever noticed ugly, hazy, gray coloration around the edges of your full-fused designs? This is especially noticeable when placing darker colored or iridized glass designs on a lighter colored background but it can happen with any color combination. This phenomenon is known as edge-devit (devitrification) and is most often caused by grinding the glass edges prior to fusing. This also occurs when using a diamond blade saw to cut your glass. One glass manufacturer explains it this way; The roughened edges in the ground area create thousands of tiny points from which crystal growth can easily propagate. The best solution is to score and break the glass as close to your final shape as possible to minimize grinding (or better yet avoid it altogether). If you must grind you could try using a light coat of clear overglaze (i.e. Fusemaster Super Spray) on the ground areas to
May 14, 2012
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