Glass Writing Titanium Pen

Price $39.95
Your Savings: - $10.00
Your Price: $29.95 USD   (26% Off)
Item# 20443
In Stock Usually ships in 1 to 2 business days.

  • Can be used to etch hand drawn designs
  • Great for signing pieces
  • Pointed tip great for fine line details
  • Features convenient pocket clip

Product Description

Ideal Signing tool
The Ti-Pen™ tool is different from most scribes because it writes by friction of the metal titanium point. A metal deposit is left in a silver color on the surface of glass, quartz, ceramics, or vitreous enamels.

Use of this tool will not damage or weaken the glass. Before use it is best to 'break in' or dull the tip to help your markings be more visible. Smooth flowing fine lines can be obtained by moistening the surface. Wider lines can be achieved by dulling the tip. 

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1 out of 5 stars
  •   Useless tool
By on
Pros : none
Cons : Totally does not work on fused glass even when directions were followed precisely.
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